Assignments

Weeks 3+: 5/11 – 5/23 – FINAL ASSIGNMENT (also on Edmodo)

Your assignment is as follows:

  1. Write a paragraph describing what you found most interesting about my research experience – this can be specifically about one of the analyses I do, one of the other scientists, life on the boat in general, etc. – if I posted about it, it’s fair game!
  2. Answer at least 3 of the questions on the Critical Thinking page. You can type your responses on the same document as your paragraph, just copy the question as well so I know what you’re answering.

Some guidelines:

  1. spelling and grammar will count – so be sure to proofread
  2. if you use the internet to find information, please include the link so I can see where you got your information (cite your sources!)
  3. if you don’t want to use the dropbox, it must be handed in to Mrs. Sorensen or Mrs. Santanello by 6/6 – no exceptions.


DUE DATE: JUNE 6, 2014

 

Week 2: 5/4 – 5/10

  • List three methods/procedures that the scientists are using on the ship that are similar to things you’ve learned and/or used in lab.  Send this to me directly through Edmodo.

Week 1: 4/27 – 5/3

  • Define the following terms: solution, solvent, solute, standard solution
  • State two safety rules mentioned in this week’s posts
  • Ask a question or comment on any post from this week (include only your first name and last initial)

37 thoughts on “Assignments

  1. A solution is a homogeneous mixture composed of only one phase. In such a mixture, a solute is a substance dissolved in another substance.The solvent does the dissolving. Two safety rules is wear a immersion safety suit and maintain a safe lab.

  2. Siena Pilnick says:

    Solution: a homogeneous mixture (the end result).
    Solute: a substance which dissolves into another substance.
    Solvent: a substance that performs the dissolving i.e. water.
    Two safety rules mentioned in this past week’s posts: Wearing a “lobster-like” immersion suit 🙂 and bolting down any equipment that might shift during the voyage.

  3. Solution: A homogeneous mixture of one, or more solutes dissolved in a solvent.
    Solute: The substance that is dissolved in a solvent.
    Solvent: The substance in which a solute dissolves.
    The two safety rules were to wear a immersion safety suit, and keep maintaining a safe lab.

  4. drose2798 says:

    Solution- homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent- the substance in which the solute is dissolved
    Solute-the substance being dissolved
    Standard solution-any solution which has a precisely known concentration. Two safety rules are: wear an immersion safety suit and keep the lab safe

  5. Danielle Schwartz says:

    Solution is homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent- the substance in which the solute is dissolved
    Solute-the substance being dissolved
    Standard solution-any solution which has a precisely known concentration. Two safety rules are: wear an immersion safety suit and keep the lab safe

  6. Victoria B says:

    Solution- homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent- the substance in which the solute is dissolved
    Solute-the substance being dissolved
    Standard solution-any solution which has a precisely known concentration. Two safety rules are: wear an immersion safety suit and keep the lab safe

  7. Jalaysia S says:

    Solution- homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent- the substance in which the solute is dissolved
    Solute-the substance being dissolved
    Standard solution-any solution which has a precisely known concentration.
    Two safety rules are: wear an immersion safety suit and keep making sure the lab is safe.

  8. Angela A says:

    Solution is a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances in which the molecules or atoms of the substances are completely dispersed.
    Solvent is the substance in which the solute is dissolved
    Solute is the substance being dissolved
    Standard solution is any solution which has a precisely known concentration. Two safety rules are: wear an immersion safety suit and keep the lab safe
    2 Safety Rules: Wear an immersion safety suit and keep the lab clean and safe

    • Matthew Zheng-Ming Hou says:

      Week 1:
      A solution is an answer to a problem, and a liquid mixture in which contains solutes dissolved into solvents.

      A solvent is what dissolves a solute. Water is known as the universal solvent because it can dissolve most covalent and ionic compounds.

      A solute is what is being dissolved into the solvent. For example, salt would be the solute in a solution of salt and water.

      Two safety rules mentioned were to wear an immersion suit and keeping the lab safe to use.

  9. Meredith S. says:

    Week 1: (sorry this is so late)
    Solution: homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent: substance that does the dissolving (of the solute)
    Solute: substance being dissolved
    Standard solution: one in which the concentration is known and is used to determine an unknown concentration
    Two safety rules:
    1. Always where immersion suit in case of an emergency
    2. To protect the equipment, make sure it is bolted or tied down to prevent any movement

  10. Allie S says:

    A solvent is the substance that does the dissolving.
    A solute is the substance that gets dissolved.
    A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.
    A standard solution is one in which concentration is known and and is used to determine on unknown concentration.
    Two safety rules mentioned was to wear an immersion suit and make sure you bolt or tie down any equipment to prevent any movement.

  11. JuliaRose M says:

    A solvent is the substance that does the dissolving.
    A solute is the substance that gets dissolved.
    A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.
    A standard solution is when there is a precise concentration that is used to aid in determining the unknown concentration.
    Two safety rules are: 1. Bolting down of EVERYTHING ad wearing the “lobster” immersion suit.

  12. Vicky L says:

    Solution- A homogeneous mixture of one or more solutes dissovled in a solvent.
    Solvent- The substance that does the dissolving.
    Solute- The substance that gets dissolved.
    Standard solution- A solution whose concentration is known accurately.
    Two safety rules: 1.Always wear an immersion safety suit 2. Keep lab clean

  13. Juliana Dmytriv says:

    Solution: a homogeneous mixture composed of only one phase
    Solvent: any substance that does the dissolving
    Solute: the minor component in a solution, dissolved in the solvent
    Standard Solution: a solution containing a precisely known concentration of an element or a substance
    Two Safety rules: always wear the immersion safety suit and always keep the lab clean/safe

  14. Erika S. says:

    Solution: homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent: substance that does the dissolving (of the solute)
    Solute: substance being dissolved
    Standard solution: one in which the concentration is known and is used to determine an unknown concentration
    Two safety rules:
    1. Always where immersion suit in case of an emergency
    2. Keep Lab at all times safe to use

  15. Jen S says:

    Solution: homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent: substance that does the dissolving of the solute
    Solute: substance being dissolved
    Standard solution: one in which the concentration is known and is used to determine an unknown concentration
    Safety rules:
    1. Always where immersion suit
    2. Keep Lab at all times safe to use(i.e clean up messes)

  16. Noah Baker says:

    Noah Baker
    Week 1:
    Solution- a homogenous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent- substance that does the dissolving
    Solute- substance that gets dissolved
    standard solution- solution containing a precisely known concentration of
    an element or a substance
    Two safety rules are:
    1. maintain a safe lab
    2. wear an immersion suit.

  17. Anonymous says:

    Hunter Lipp
    Week 1 Assignment:
    A solvent is the substance that does the dissolving.
    A solute is the substance that gets dissolved.
    A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.
    A standard solution is when there is a precise concentration that is used to aid in determining the unknown concentration.

    Two safety rules are to wear an immersion suit and make sure you bolt or tie down any equipment to prevent any movement.

  18. Valentina Battista says:

    Week One: Valentina Battista

    Definitions-
    The substance in the solution that does the dissolving. (Universal solvent=water)
    The substance in a solution that gets dissolved.
    A solution in which there is a precisely known concentration of a substance or an element.
    A homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.
    1. Always wear the immersion safety suit and 2. always keep the lab clean and safe.

  19. Shane H says:

    A solution is a homogeneous mixture of one, or more solutes dissolved in a solvent.
    The solute is the substance that is dissolved in a solvent.
    The solvent is the substance in which a solute dissolves.
    Safety rules:
    1. keeping work area neat and organized.
    2. Always wear an immersion suit.

  20. Danielle Estevez says:

    Solution is homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent- the substance in which the solute is dissolved
    Solute-the substance being dissolved
    Standard solution-any solution which has a precisely known concentration. Two safety rules are: wear an immersion safety suit and keep the lab safe

  21. Anonymous says:

    Daria B.
    Week 1:
    Solution: the process by which a gas, liquid, or solid is dispersed homogeneously in a gas, liquid, or solid without chemical change
    Solute: The substance getting dissolved in a mixture
    Solvent: a substance that dissolves another to form a solution
    Two safety rules is always wearing the immersion safety suit and always keeping the lab safe and clean.

  22. Catia T. says:

    I thought the most interesting part of your research experience was the blog post entitled “Let the Science Begin!”. I thought it was amazing how the 12 large bottles, called The Niskins, are able to be launched all the way down to just above the ocean floor. Being able to collect H2O samples from a variety of different depths so fast is fascinating. I can just imagine a bunch of scientist running around the ship trying to analyze samples within such a short time.

    1. Describe the process for making a standard solution.
    A standard solution is a solution whose concentration is known accurately. First, take a watch glass and place it on the balance. Set it to zero. Carefully weigh out the required mass of substance. Transfer this amount to a beaker. Add water from a wash bottle to dissolve it. Use some of the water to rinse all the substance off the watch glass. Do this at least twice. Stir with a glass rod until all the solid is dissolved, then transfer the solution to the volumetric flask. Use more water from the wash bottle to rinse out the beaker and the glass rod. Do this at least twice. Add water to just below the line on the volumetric flask. Add the final drops with a teat pipette to ensure that the bottom of the meniscus is on the line. Put the lid on the flask and turn the flask over a couple of times to mix the solution. Label your solution with your name, the date, and the contents.

    2. Why is acid always added to water?
    A large amount of heat is released when strong acids are mixed with water. Adding more acid releases more heat. If you add water to acid, you form an extremely concentrated solution of acid initially. So much heat is released that the solution may boil very violently, splashing concentrated acid out of the container! If you add acid to water, the solution that forms is very dilute and the small amount of heat released is not enough to vaporize and spatter it. So Always Add Acid to water, and never the reverse.

    3. What is an isotope? Why are they important?
    An isotope is any of two or more forms of a chemical element, having the same number of protons in the nucleus, or the same atomic number, but having different numbers of neutrons in the nucleus, or different atomic weights. There are 275 isotopes of the 81 stable elements, in addition to over 800 radioactive isotopes, and every element has known isotopic forms. Isotopes of a single element possess almost identical properties. Isotopes are vital since they can keep up with a fission of chain reaction and offer a nuclear fuel for a chemical reaction.

  23. Julia Citron says:

    Julia Citron

    A soluton is a liquid mixture in which the solute is uniformly distributed within the solvent.
    The solvent is the substance that is doing the dissolvng.
    The solute is the substance that is being dissolved
    A standard solution is a solution containing a precisely known concentration of
    an element or substance.

    Two safety rules mentioned in this past week’s posts: wear a immersion safety suit and bolting down any equipment that may move while the boat is sailing.

  24. Josh J says:

    Week 1:
    Solution-A homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent-It is the substance in which the solute is dissolved.
    Solute-The substance that is dissolved in a solution.
    Standard Solution-Any solution which has a precisely known concentration.
    Two safety rules are to: 1. bolt and tie down all equipment
    2. wear an immersion safety suit

  25. Josh J says:

    List three methods/procedures that the scientists are using on the ship that are similar to things you’ve learned and/or used in lab.

    1. Scientists are solving for molarity of solutions
    2. Scientists are studying the effects of pressure
    3. Scientists are studying and utilizing isotopes.

  26. Josh J says:

    I found the entry titled McLane Pumps to be extremely interesting. I enjoyed that you included the interactions the ship has with marine life. Furthermore, I thought the description of the pump to be highly informative and entertaining to read. Prior to reading the entry, I had never heard of the equipment but now I feel confident in understanding how the machinery works. The McLane pumps pump large amounts of seawater from the ocean onto the ships. The collected seawater is then filtrated which allows for concentrated particles to be examined. In addition, the pump is controlled by a computer which allows one to program various settings such as flow rate. I was amazed at the complex machinery and process needed to examine and analyze the seawater. Finally, I liked how the entry related to a previous entry on isotopes. From the filters of the McLane pumps, tests such as measurements of isotope ratios can be conducted.

    1. Describe the process for making a standard solution.
    Determine the mass of the desired compound. Dissolve the compound in pure water. Transfer the solution to a volumetric flask. Rinse the beaker the solution was previously contained in and add it to the flask. Add distilled water until the calibration mark and shake well.

    2. All chemicals had to be massed prior to leaving. Why can’t we use balances on the ship?
    The rocking of the boat as a result of the waves of the oceans renders balances inaccurate and useless on a ship.

    9. What is an isotope? Why are they important?
    Isotopes are atoms of the same element with different masses. They have the same number of protons but different number of neutrons. Isotopes are important because they can be used to determine the rates and amounts of different biological processes.

  27. Anonymous says:

    Solution-a homogeneous mixture of one or more solutes dissolved in a solvent
    Solute-The substance that is dissolved in a solvent
    Solvent-the substance in which a solute dissolves.
    The two main safety rules were to wear an immersion safety suit and always keep the lab safe and clean.

    • shelby says:

      Shelby Jaffe-
      I found the McLane pumps very interesting. McLane pumps allow for large volume filtration which is around (300 L). Seawater gets pumped through while the pump is still in the ocean and lots of particles go onto the filter. At the left is a black casing-which houses the filters and is where the water flows. I thought this was pretty neat how the pumps work. Water flows out of the pump at the bottom right- through a flow meter and out the white spigot. I love how they use the machinery and process needed to examine and analyze the water. I also liked when it talked about the isotopes. Finally I liked how it talked about the filter sizes. I liked how they talked about all of the different filter sizes. Filter size refers to space between the pores- larger spaces capture larger particles like (phytoplankton), whereas smaller cells, like bacteria. Using many filters to collect particles of many different sizes called size fractionation. I never knew that, it was pretty neat to learn about this.

      1.Describe the process for making a standard solution. Determine the mass of the desired compound. Next, dissolve the compund in water, then transfer it to a volumetric flask. Rinse the beaker the solution was contained in and add it to the flask.

      2.Why is acid always added to water?
      A large amount of heat is released when strong acids are mixed with water. Adding more acid releases more heat. If you add water to acid, you form an extremely concentrated solution of acid.
      alot of heat is released so the solution might boil violently splashing acid out of the whole container.

      3. What is an isotope? Why are they important?
      An isotope is any two or more forms of a chemical element, having the same number of protons in the nucleus, or the same atomic number, but has different number of neutrons in the nucleus.Isotopes of a single element possess almost identical properties. Isotopes are vital since they can keep up with fission of chain reaction and offer a nuclear fuel for a chemical reaction to take place.

  28. Anonymous says:

    solution- a homogenous mixture of two or more substances
    solute- the substance being dissolved
    solvent- the substance doing the dissolving
    standard solution- a solution with a precisely known concentration
    two safety rules- wear and immersion safety suit and make sure the lab in safe, neat, and clean

    Madison R.

  29. Falynn D. says:

    Definitions:
    • A solution is homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.
    • A solvent is the substance that does the dissolving.
    • A solute is the substance that gets dissolved.
    • A standard solution is one in which concentration is known and is used to determine an unknown concentration.
    Two safety rules:
    1. Always wear the immersion safety suit
    2. To always keep the lab clean and safe.

  30. Nicole says:

    Solution- homogeneous mixture of two or more substances
    Solvent- the substance in which the solute is dissolved
    Solute-the substance being dissolved
    Standard solution-any solution which has a precisely known concentration.
    Two safety rules:
    wear an immersion safety suit
    keep the lab safe and clean

  31. Montana Riggs says:

    My favorite blog post that I found the most interesting was the one “Spotlight Series: Qixing Ji”. I thought your incubation experiment was really cool and interesting because it was good for us to know what is going on in our environment (with the release of N2O in the air from humans). Learning how you compared the ratios of the natural gas emitted from the ocean’s bacteria to the gas that’s in the environment gives us a better idea of our impact on the gas emission itself. The picture was also really cool but it was gross.
    2. Why is acid always added to water?
    When very strong acids are added to water, it causes the water to bubble and boil violently almost immediately when added. When weaker acids are added, it dilutes the solution, so if other acids are added it won’t bubble as violently or cause the solution to splatter everywhere. So always add acids to water so that you can dilute the solution.
    3. What is an isotope? Why are they important?
    An isotope is any of two or more forms of a chemical element, having the same number of protons in the nucleus, or the same atomic number, but having different numbers of neutrons in the nucleus, or different atomic weights. They can be really important because can keep up with a fission of chain reaction and offer a nuclear fuel for a chemical reaction.
    6. “If a dynamic equilibrium is disturbed by changing the conditions, the position of equilibrium moves to counteract the change.” Three examples are: 1) concentration change 2). Pressure change 3). Temperature change

  32. What I found most interesting about Ms. Babbin’s research was the “Spotlight Series- Keiran Swart”. The foraminifera Protista that he study are extremely fascinating to learn about. It’s enthralling to see how such a small organism can have such a huge impact in one environment. It’s also cool to be able to use these organisms, like fossils, to give you an idea of what life was like a long time ago. His job and the experiences Keiran has had seem very adventurous and outgoing. The nutrients that are inside the foraminifera is amazing. The isotopic composition of these organisms if truly magnificent and breathtaking. His role in identifying and testing the gases absorbed by these organisms seems very scientific! I wish I could have an opportunity like that! He obviously seems like he has a passion for what he is doing!
    1. Describe the process for making a standard solution. Determine the mass of the desired compound. Next, dissolve the compound in water, then transfer it to a volumetric flask. Rinse the beaker the solution was contained in and add it to the flask.
    2. 2. Why is acid always added to water?
    A large amount of heat is released when strong acids are mixed with water. Adding more acid releases more heat. If you add water to acid, you form an extremely concentrated solution of acid.
    a lot of heat is released so the solution might boil violently splashing acid out of the whole container.
    3. What is an isotope? Why are they important?
    An isotope is any two or more forms of a chemical element, having the same number of protons in the nucleus, or the same atomic number, but has different number of neutrons in the nucleus. Isotopes of a single element possess almost identical properties. Isotopes are vital since they can keep up with fission of chain reaction and offer a nuclear fuel for a chemical reaction to take place.

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